Author: No One
•miercuri, octombrie 23, 2013
Am auzit aceasta poveste spusa intr-un film anime. De fapt tot filmul e in esenta aceasta poveste. Imi place ptr "brutalitatea" sa, fata de varianta ptr copii pe care o stim, si ptr ca tu stii (dar ea nu) ce va fi in final. Luata de pe wiki.

Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade is the version of Rotkäppchen ('Red Cap') transcribed directly from the film by Chance Wolf, and used by permission. The lines quoted here from Jin-Roh are based on a traditional oral tale which was told by a 10 year old girl in Haute-Loire, France, and transcribed by Jean Baptiste Victor Smith in 1870. This interpretation predates that of Charles Perrault (considered the first written iteration of the 'Little Red Riding Hood' tale), and is the only one in which the protagonist visits her mother instead of her grandmother, and features the "clothing made completely out of metal" as found in the Jin-Roh version, below:

Once there was a little girl, called Little Red Riding Hood, for she wore always that red riding hood. Now her mother had made her a suit of clothing for her to wear, and this suit of clothing had been made completely out of metal. Her mother then went away to stay alone in a little cottage in the woods, and told the girl, "only when you have worn out this suit of clothing shall you come and visit me." So the girl, nodding solemnly, bade her mother goodbye and set to work to wearing out her suit of metal clothing.

Every day, she rubbed herself against the walls of her home, so that the clothing would be worn out sooner. Every day, day-by-day, without fail she would rub herself against the walls, till her clothes became thinner, and thinner till she completely wore it out. Elated, she made some bread with butter and wheat cakes for her mother, intending them as gifts, and left her house for her mother's cottage in the woods.

Along the way, just as she was about to enter the woods, she encountered a wolf, which asked for some of her cakes and bread. She refused, for it was to be a gift to her mother. Unfazed, the wolf asked if she would be traveling via the road of pins or the road of needles. The young girl replied that she would be using the road of pins. Thus, the wolf ran quickly down the road of needles and knocked upon the door to the girl's mother's cottage.

"Who is it?" the girl's mother asked.

"It is I, your daughter, come to bring you cakes and bread." And when the mother opened the door, the wolf killed her, eating most of her.

Sometime later, the young girl finally arrived at her mother's cottage. Knocking upon the door, she heard her mother call out in a strange voice, "who's at the door?"

"It is I, your daughter, come to bring you bread and cakes, for I have worn out my clothing of metal and now come to visit you."

"Come in my daughter, the door is not locked!" But the door was locked, and the little girl had to climb in through the little hole at the bottom of the door.

Once inside, she noticed that her mother was in bed. After the long walk through the woods the girl was hungry, and said thus to her mother. "Mother, I'm hungry, for I have traveled far and deep to this place."

And so the reply was, "there is meat in the cupboard, that you may consume to sate your hunger."

And as the little girl was about to eat the meat from the cupboard, suddenly a cat jumped onto the cupboard and told the girl, "do not eat this meat, for this is the meat of your mother, whom has been murdered most foul by the wolf that now sleeps in her bed!"

Thus the little girl told her mother, "Mother, this cat says that it is your meat that I am about to eat!"

And her mother told her, "Surely this cat is lying, for am I not alive and well, talking to you even now? So throw your stick at the cat and eat the meat to sate your hunger." So the girl obediently threw her stick at the cat, thus scaring it off before consuming the meat.

When she had eaten her fill, she felt thirsty, and told her mother so. "There is a bottle of wine above the fireplace child, drink it, and sate your thirst."

And as the girl went to the fireplace and picked up the bottle, a bird flew onto the fireplace and chirped, "little girl, do not drink this wine, for it is the blood of your mother that has been killed by the wolf whom now lies upon the bed."

And when the little girl said to her mother, "mother, there is a bird that says that this bottle of red wine that I am about to drink is your blood, and that you were killed by a wolf, whom now lies in your place!"

And thus came the reply, "child, am I not alive and well? So is the bird lying. Throw your cloak at it, that you may then drink of the wine in peace, and vanquish your thirst." Thus the girl did as she was told, and drank of the wine, till not a drop was left.

Now when she had eaten and drank her fill, till hungry and thirsty she was not, suddenly the girl felt sleepy. Thus her mother said to her, "come child, and rest by my side. I would have you by me once more." And the girl walked to her mother's side and undressed. Putting her clothes of cotton and wool neatly by the side, she climbed into the sheets with mother, so as to rest. There she saw her mother, looking very strange.

"Why mother," She exclaimed, "what big ears you have!"

"The better to hear you with, my child." Came the reply.

"Why mother," the girl continued, "what big eyes you have!"

"All the better to see you with, my child." Came the reply.

"But mother, what big paws you have!" The girl exclaimed.

"The better to hug you with." Came the reply.

"Oh mother, what big, sharp teeth and terrible mouth you have!" The girl cried out.

"The better to eat you with!" The wolf said.

And at that, the wolf pounced upon the girl and devoured her, rending apart her flesh and bone, eating her alive, ignoring her screams.

And thus, the wolf ate the girl, sating its hunger.

Mi-am adus aminte, cand mi-am zis sa pun aceasta poveste aici, ca am vazut Scufita Rosie la teatrul de papusi din Constanta.

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